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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Noopti 13 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #2954

    Ahriakin
    Participant

    Hi folks,

    Looking through various posts and job threads here and in other game related sites there seems to be a disparity between the importance many developers claim audio has in the industry and the actual effort put into recruiting musicians and sound designers (at least among indi developers).
    It would seem to be the last area to develope in a project, if at all. Is it that most companies/developers expect a publisher to handle audio contracting, is the statement of importance merely lip service, or are you all ye coder folks mainly just happy without properly themed soundtracks?

  • #10435

    Grifmike
    Participant

    Hi –

    In Kapooki we have our own sound engineer / composer who works on all our products from the very beginning. Kapooki place strong emphasis on developing new soundtracks and custom sound effects in order to add a distinctive audio flavour to our games. We also hate canned effects as they generally never really provide the full effect/s we want.

    So from a Kapooki perspective we certainly do not just pay lip service to the importance of sound.

    Regards,
    Mike.

  • #10445

    Ahriakin
    Participant

    Excellent, that’s good to hear. And it’s nice to see you place an emphasis on not using stock effects – if I hear that same damn ‘vishhhh’ sound effect in one more movie explosion or fly by effect I’m going to go nuts :).

  • #10521

    Noopti
    Participant

    I think generally a musician/composer is usually the least important thing on the companies mind when they are developing a game, unless:

    A)They are a large company, or have a large publisher behind them who can supply them with such resources

    or

    B)They are one of the rare smaller companies who feel it is important to create orginal soundtracks for a game.

    Most companies use freelance composers for their music needs, rarely do you find a composer actually working soley for a developer.
    Sound engineers on the other hand are more common, as sound effects are vital to game, but it is generally rare to find more than one sound engineer even in a mid-large size company.

    In summary, most of the time a company outsources musicians and sound engineers.

    Dave

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