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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  mal 11 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #5098

    mal
    Participant

    Here’s a clinker…

    http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=377757

    “The patent which was filed in 1987, refers to “a graphics display terminal [which] performs a pan operation with respect to a view motion center to effectuate spherical panning, thereby providing perspective and non-perspective views.” which would mean that, any game which features a moving camera and zoom effects could be accused of infringing the patent.”

    and…

    “Atari will pay $300,000 in full, to settle the lawsuit. Atari is the only publisher to reveal details of the settlement so far.”

    Ouch!

    If any of you are writing a FPS which has a zoom mode, you’d better include a handful of thousand dollar bills to keep these guys off your back.

    And in a related patent story…
    http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?aid=14951

    “The Atari documents also confirmed that the publisher has reached a settlement with iEntertainment Network, which filed suit against Atari, Epic, Valve, Sierra and several Sony companies, including Sony Online Entertainment.”

    “The lawsuit referred to online games, specifically technologies which minimise latency. Atari has agreed to pay USD 25,000 as part of a total USD 175,000 settlement which releases all parties from the claims and grants patent usage rights.”

    Are there any obvious game techniques out there that aren’t patented?

    Like using a physical device ( keyboard, mouse, controller ) to manipulate a graphics display terminal ( screen ) [which then] performs a pan or rotate operation with respect to a view motion center to effectuate spherical panning and rotation, thereby providing user controlled perspective and non-perspective views.” ( moving about )

    Patent Pending, CanDo Interactive

    Fee: 2 pints of Guinness
    Mal

  • #29896

    Nifty
    Participant

    As always I may be wrong, but I think Patents cease to apply when the tech becomes part of the state of the art, those companies are probably liable because they produced 3D games way back when, but now those operations are a well known and integral part of the industry and so anyone starting up now should not be affected. I think.

  • #29899

    Steph
    Participant

    Are there any obvious game techniques out there that aren’t patented?

    Mal[/quote:dd9c7ac0fe]

    Probably not. In the same way that what are today ‘obvious’ game techniques were probably not ‘obvious’ 10 or even 5 years ago.

    In the same way that what are today ‘obvious’ software development techniques were probably not ‘obvious’ 20 years ago and if such were patented then, they are now free to use through lapse of the relevant patents at the end of their 20-or-so years’ life.

    As always I may be wrong, but I think Patents cease to apply when the tech becomes part of the state of the art.[/quote:dd9c7ac0fe]

    Patents cease to apply when they lapse. Either through non-payment of renewal fees (payable periodically), or at expiry of their term (20 years usually).

    The state of the art has nothing to do whatsoever with how long patents remain in force.

    those companies are probably liable because they produced 3D games way back when, but now those operations are a well known and integral part of the industry and so anyone starting up now should not be affected. I think.[/quote:dd9c7ac0fe]

    So much the better for the patentee. That’s what I’ve been trying to get the industry to understand for years (through participation with IGDA and sites like Gamedevelopers.ie), and that’s the way it’s played. :wink:

    Anyone starting up will be affected. Unless they come up with a new technology themselves, which either goes around the patent claims or which the patentee themselves infringe, whereby a deal will be hashed…

  • #29902

    kyotokid
    Keymaster

    *mumbles* Stupid Sega with their pointing arrow patent *grumble*

  • #30017

    kyotokid
    Keymaster

    Check out Microsofts 5000 patent:

    # A system for generating a spectator experience in real time from a game or event, such as highlights, instant replays, and unique views of the action within a game to enhance the experience for spectators rather than players. Using viewing controls, a spectator can control one or more virtual cameras to select desired viewpoints or an automated camera control to frame the action and perform specific cuts to best convey the story and action. The game and in turn the spectator experience may vary as a function of participant interactions and other contributions to the game based on real-time spectator activity.

    # A portal such as a Web site to access spectator-related services such as schedules and information on multiple games and events as well as the number of spectators and participants in each. The portal allows the spectator to find the most popular games to watch, preview the action, and then connect to the desired game or event.[/quote:dd59a65f0e]

    How crap is that?

    http://www.gamesindustry.biz/press_release.php?aid=15133

  • #30018

    mal
    Participant

    Nearly as crap(tm) as this patent for rich multimedia applications

    ( btw you owe me royalties for using crap(tm) )

    > covers the design and creation of most rich-media applications used over the Internet.
    > it could license nearly any rich-media Internet application across a broad range of devices and networks.

    > The patent covers all rich-media technology implementations, including Flash, Flex, Java, Ajax, and XAML, when the rich-media application is accessed on any device over the Internet, including desktops, mobile devices, set-top boxes, and video game consoles <– note this bit

    http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=180206472&cid=RSSfeed_IWK_News

    Taken directly from the article…

    > If the patent is enforced broadly, she says, “Anybody who does
    anything with rich applications will have to pay royalties to the company.”

    And one of the guys behind it…

    > Neil Balthaser, a former VP of strategy for Macromedia

    Mal

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