Home Forums Education, Training and Jobs The absolute Basics for programming

  • This topic has 12 replies, 10 voices, and was last updated 12 years ago by Anonymous.
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    • #6993
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Ok, so Im new here.
      I’ve known for a good while that I want to work in computer games development as a Programmer.

      Im in TY year, 16 and I want to start getting serious about it.
      I got a B in higher maths and a C in higher science (although I will improve it) and I wanted to know what’s the best way to get to get ahead of everyone else.

      I love video games, Computers and figuring out how things work.
      I was thinking about buying ‘beginning programming for dummies’.
      I haven’t sorted out work experience in any sort of computers sector yet but I signed up for a one day workshop (although I don’t yet know if Ill be accepted to go).

      So does anyone have any good advice on where to start eg; researching C++ ect.

    • #42697
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve known for a good while that I want to work in computer games development as a Programmer. [/quote:6ef8a72def]
      It’s very early to say that, if you’ve never programmed, or worked in computer games, but I know what you mean.

      Im in TY year, 16 and I want to start getting serious about it. [/quote:6ef8a72def]
      This is a fine time to start – I was around that age when I started programming seriously, and the advantage is that when you show up in CS in college, you are in the 30% of the students that have some idea what they are getting themselves in for :-)

      So does anyone have any good advice on where to start eg; researching C++ ect.[/quote:6ef8a72def]
      Not to be smart with you, but go and search for the information – there’s plenty of previous threads in this forum covering similar ground, and there’s a huge amount of resources on the Internet covering this.

      A very important part of being a programmer is the ability to go and search for information that’s out there on your own. There’s a lot of great resources out there on the Internet, and it’s great to spend time learning how to sift through it and find the good stuff.

      But some advice.
      If you are determined, my advice is to learn about becoming a programmer first, and a games programmer later (like, months, if not years, later).

      First off, try to get yourself started with programming to find out whether you actually like it.

      Get a programming environment setup on your PC, buy a book that’s an introduction to programming in a language you choose, get online resources that tell you about the language and start programming.
      Be determined and persevere – progress will be slow at the start, with a huge array of new concepts, but you’ll get the hang of things if you keep trying, and reading up on things you don’t understand.

      I recommend Java as a first language; everyone will have a different language they recommend for different reasons. Many (most?) introductory college courses use Java.
      The development environments are free, and there’s a load of online resources out there.

      In fact, you could start by going here:
      http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/win32.html
      and doing what it says.
      Then you’ll have written and run a program, and you’ll have an environment you can use to learn with.

      Then try change the program, learn more about what you are seeing, how the whole thing works, read tutorials etc.

    • #42701
      Anonymous
      Inactive

    • #42705
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      As your in TY you may have the opportunity to establish a Programming Club. I know a few schools are doing this, as EDCL is perceived a too basic and too boring. If you have friends interesting in programming – that’s a big help – as you can help each other through the learning curve.

      Try out some competitions; students have entered games into the BT Young Scientist – Technology Section. There are also events like SchoolBots.ie ( Java-coding battletank event), the XNA Ireland Challenge for Schools (C# based games), Global Game Jam (globalgamejam.org) … etc the list goes on.

    • #42707
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I agree with feral. Start with Java and learn to program simple little programs, like those that are getting mentioned on the programming thread at the moment. Java is great purely because its got lots of documentation. People struggle with C++ as a starter language too as pointers can be a bugger to get your head around. Alternative to Java would be C# though, same kind of thing and seems to be the new big thing.

    • #42726
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      As a non-programmer, my advice would be to practice the following phrases in the mirror;

      "hmm, it should work :? "
      "Oh, ok, copy the exe from my kit then"
      "It works on my machine"

    • #42733
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      RainbowCatMagic

      I recomend the following.

      Head over to Amazon and buy this book:
      "Beginning C++ Game Programming."
      http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C-Game-Programming-Development/dp/1592002056

      Why? Well, there are plenty of tutorials online, but most of those will be (IMO) disjointed, conflicting, and so on.

      Pick this book up, read it thoroughly, and by the end you will be able to write a simple black-jack card game. Nothing particularly "visual," but it will give you the core concepts, within a games context.

      When you’ve finished that book, I’d move on to a 3D Mathematics for game programming, like this one:

      "3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development"
      http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Graphics-Development-Wordware-Library/dp/1556229119/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224801241&sr=1-1

      That’ll keep you busy for a while, and expose you to some fantastic, practical application of geometry, trig, etc.

      Best of luck.
      Brendan.

    • #42741
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      As a non-programmer, my advice would be to practice the following phrases in the mirror;

      "hmm, it should work :? "
      "Oh, ok, copy the exe from my kit then"
      "It works on my machine"[/quote:42fdd8d0e0]

      Have you been following me around or something??

    • #42742
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      "that’s just not possible" and "are you sure you’ve got the latest version" are also good one’s to know.

    • #42745
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      When you’ve finished that book, I’d move on to a 3D Mathematics for game programming, like this one:

      "3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development"
      http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Graphics-Development-Wordware-Library/dp/1556229119/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224801241&sr=1-1

      That’ll keep you busy for a while, and expose you to some fantastic, practical application of geometry, trig, etc.[/quote:9d1dcd4712]
      Seconding this book alright, worked through it during the Summer and it’s made life so much easier for me over here.

      As for what language to start with, well I’m not sure anymore really. I used to always say start with Java and then move onto C++ but looking at the course content and performance of of the undergrads here it’s clear that, while the learning curve may be a bit higher, it’s perfectly possible for them to start on the latter. I guess one could argue that learning Java opens more non-gaming career doors after graduation however if someone is posting here it’s obvious that they have some idea of where the want to go in life.

    • #42755
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here’s one i have used far too much.

      " No the code is perfect , its the stupid engine that cant handle it , thats why it keeps crashing"

      "Comment my code ? sure why do that , when i know what everything does "

    • #42756
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Im in TY year, 16 and I want to start getting serious about it.

      [/quote:2a877c4afe]

      i am in DIT at the moment and a few of us are helping tutor , 2nd level student once a week who come in to take a short Game Maker course being run by two lecturters from the school of computing, its basic stuff really , i could look in to get your name put down for the class if your interested .

    • #42871
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Programmers that can draw are going to be in much better shape than an animator specializing in putting talking mouths on cats. The solutions of tomorrow are not going to fall into the production or organizational categories of today."[/quote:8364e5245e]

      Gabe says "Start Drawing"

      http://www.gamedaily.com/articles/news/valves-newell-gives-advice-to-aspiring-game-developers/?biz=1

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