Kapooki Wants Testers

If interested in becoming a tester please send an e-mail to the following address mailto: info@kapookigames.cominfo@kapookigames.com and make sure to include the following information!! (very very important)

1) Full Name
2) Machine Spec (or specs) you can use to test with – they want high and low – so don’t worry if your machine is 3 years old.
3) Type of internet connection Dial-up OR Broadband.

In order to be accepted as an external tester they will require you to sign and fax back to them a standard NDA.

They expect to begin the external testing program by the second week of January 2005.

Any person accepted into the program is expected to keep all information relating to the game strictly confidential until after it is officially released.

Kapooki Wants Testers – 2

If interested in becoming a tester please send an e-mail to the following address mailto: info@kapookigames.cominfo@kapookigames.com and make sure to include the following information!! (very very important)

1) Full Name
2) Machine Spec (or specs) you can use to test with – they want high and low – so don’t worry if your machine is 3 years old.
3) Type of internet connection Dial-up OR Broadband.

In order to be accepted as an external tester they will require you to sign and fax back to them a standard NDA.

They expect to begin the external testing program by the second week of January 2005.

Any person accepted into the program is expected to keep all information relating to the game strictly confidential until after it is officially released.

Fun While It Lasted

Pavel Barter talks to Matthew Lloyd, Funcom Dublin veteran

How did you get the job with Funcom Ireland?
“I knew about Funcom from reading a newspaper article about them. I was a student in Ballyfermot College of Further Education at the time, studying computer animation and thought ‘this place is right up my alley’ I started out as a graphic designer but moved on to in-game modelling.”

What are your memories of the rest of the team?
“ I worked with one of the most talented group of people I have known. I was sad to say goodbye to them all. I learned so much there.”

In terms of the working environment, were your offices impressive?
We started out in Clonskeagh in a medium sized office. A couple of years later we moved into a larger office in Sandyford. It did always seem a bit cramped but that’s because we all needed a lot of space to stand our Star Wars figures.”

What were the advantages and disadvantages for a developer based in Dublin?
“The main advantage was the fact that we were the only company developing games in Dublin at all. There was only a few of us in there and you had to know your stuff to get in. However if the only games company in Dublin goes under then you are in a bit of a state trying to find work. ‘Would you like fries with that?’”

In your opinion, why did Funcom Ireland eventually close?
“Because of ‘over spending’ on behalf of the Norway office and the great wisdom that the Xbox ‘would not produce the goods for online gaming’.”

When did you leave and what did you go on to do next?
“I didn’t leave willingly. We were all told on a Tuesday that the company would be going in liquidation with the loss of all jobs and we had to clear our desks by Thursday: don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out! I was very fortunate to land on my feet, and soon after being made redundant landed my current job as a teacher in Computer Animation and 3d Modelling in Ballfermot College of Further Education.”

Fun While It Lasted – 2

Pavel Barter talks to Matthew Lloyd, Funcom Dublin veteran

How did you get the job with Funcom Ireland?
“I knew about Funcom from reading a newspaper article about them. I was a student in Ballyfermot College of Further Education at the time, studying computer animation and thought ‘this place is right up my alley’ I started out as a graphic designer but moved on to in-game modelling.”

What are your memories of the rest of the team?
“ I worked with one of the most talented group of people I have known. I was sad to say goodbye to them all. I learned so much there.”

In terms of the working environment, were your offices impressive?
We started out in Clonskeagh in a medium sized office. A couple of years later we moved into a larger office in Sandyford. It did always seem a bit cramped but that’s because we all needed a lot of space to stand our Star Wars figures.”

What were the advantages and disadvantages for a developer based in Dublin?
“The main advantage was the fact that we were the only company developing games in Dublin at all. There was only a few of us in there and you had to know your stuff to get in. However if the only games company in Dublin goes under then you are in a bit of a state trying to find work. ‘Would you like fries with that?’”

In your opinion, why did Funcom Ireland eventually close?
“Because of ‘over spending’ on behalf of the Norway office and the great wisdom that the Xbox ‘would not produce the goods for online gaming’.”

When did you leave and what did you go on to do next?
“I didn’t leave willingly. We were all told on a Tuesday that the company would be going in liquidation with the loss of all jobs and we had to clear our desks by Thursday: don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out! I was very fortunate to land on my feet, and soon after being made redundant landed my current job as a teacher in Computer Animation and 3d Modelling in Ballfermot College of Further Education.”

Fun Anyone?

Tabitha, Brains, Tempest: names which don’t exactly trip off the tongue like Gordon Freeman, Solid Snake or Jack Carver. Still, around the turn of the millennium, these pixilated scamps were familiar to thousands of young PlayStation fans. They were the Speed Freaks, stars of a wobbly kart racer awash with effervescent eye candy; and you can forget about their cod American accents because these cartoon critters were Dubs through and through. From a global perspective, Funcom Dublin (the birthplace of Speed Freaks) was a mere blip on the development radar, but in the history of Irish development its significance is far greater. For the first time, Irish developers began crafting entertainment for the PlayStation generation. What’s more, their games weren’t half bad.

Funcom’s genesis was in colder climates. In 1993, the company formed in Oslo and began work on two projects, A Dinosaur’s Tale and Daze Before Christmas. The following year, while production continued in Norway, Funcom Dublin Ltd. was set up with 20 employees and a contract for an early PlayStation title, Impact Racing. Jørgen Tharaldsen, Funcom Product Director recalls the reasons behind the creation of an Irish premises. “We decided to set up an office in Dublin because of several factors, one of the most important being the art resources in the city. We saw the need to have a department within Funcom which could specialise in console games. While looking for interesting places we naturally explored every detail from recruitment to rent, wages, taxes and more. We chose Ireland in the end… there were mostly advantages, as we saw it, compared to many other places. ”

image2

Having found a suitable office on Furze Road in Dublin’s Sandyford Industrial Estate, Funcom set about recruiting staff, many from design courses at the National College of Art and Design in Dun Laoghaire and Ballyfermot PLC. “We recruited locally, actually there were (almost) no Norwegians working at the Irish office,” says Jørgen. Senior Software Engineer Gareth Lewin, who joined the company a few years into its incarnation, hailed from further afield. “I started working on game development in Israel. The Israeli game development industry is very tough, and after moving from failed company to failed company I started looking for jobs abroad. I tried the USA, but due to Visa problems, that wasn’t a real option. I was very much into MMORPG’s, so I sent an email to Funcom (who were developing Anarchy Online at the time) and got a response that the Dublin studio wanted to interview me. I went for an interview, it went well, and I relocated to lovely Dublin.”

In 1998 a publishing deal was struck with Activision for a scrambler motor-racer called D.I.R.T. The deal fell through but the game steamed ahead and the following year the newly monikered Championship Motocross featuring Ricky Carmichael was released under THQ’s mantle. “We also released a 2001 version of this series. I am very proud of the realistic control we were able to get into this title, and still think this was the best motorcross game which was released for PS1,” says Jørgen. The next project to be released was Speed Freaks, in August 1999. The game had been picked up by Sony Corporation, under a deal wherby Funcom would receive royalties on each copy sold as well as a lump sum fee. It was launched in North America, under the title Speed Punks, in early 2000. “The game was geared towards a younger audience and got rave reviews. It was considered by journalists to be the best karting game on the PS1, competing against games like Crash Bandicoot Racing, Mario Kart on Nintendo’s platform and others.”

image3

In July 2000, buoyed by the success of these two PlayStation titles, Funcom announced that its Irish branch would now focus resources on the (then mysterious) Xbox platform. By this time the Dublin office employed 25. “After evaluating the Playstation 2 and the Xbox technology for several months we have taken the strategic decision to go for Microsoft’s new gaming console,” Funcom President, Andre Backen, said at the time. “We believe that Xbox has significant market potential due to both cutting edge technology and Microsoft’s marketing muscle. On top of that, exploiting the new technology reduces our development cycle by several months, which also cuts development costs by approximately 20%.”

But in Norway changes were afoot and the writing was on the wall for Funcom Dublin. The Irish studio only developed console titles but Funcom had seen considerable success with online products like Backgammon and Paradigm Shift (1997), Funcom Hearts and Funcom Spades (1998). By the end of 1999, almost 20,000 games of Backgammon were played every week on Funcom’s site. The potential for massively multi-player online games was now coming to fruition and
Funcom Norway began work on the largest project it had ever undertaken. The result, Anarchy Online, was an ambitious sci-fi RPG – a huge success but also a huge investment, and for the Irish team there were disastrous repercussions. The office closed in August 2001 after six years and three unique successful projects.

“We had to close the studio in order to put all focus on Anarchy Online,” Jørgen Tharaldsen contends. “It was not an easy decision to make, but seeing that we are performing very well again today, while also being back in the console production area, I guess you can say it was the right decision. Like many other game developers we faced some rough times, and we had to focus on what we thought would benefit the entire company the most. Seeing we spent some €17m on the development of Anarchy Online before launch I guess you can say it was easy to put the focus on the MMOG side of our business.”

image4

Sadly, Funcom Dublin’s only Xbox project – Jet Sprint MX – was abandoned, despite being close to completion and looking a good deal slicker than most next gen speed boat competition. The various programmers, artists, and other staff members flittered off to other jobs in Ireland and throughout the world. As for Funcom, the company is set to launch Dreamfall – the sequel to Funcom Norway’s The Longest Journey (1999), considered by many to be the greatest graphic adventure of all time. The company now has branches in Switzerland and North America. Today there are no hard feelings about the company’s closure, either from former employees or Funcom. For Gareth Lewin, who recently worked on Microsoft’s Sudeki, the memories are “very fond. Funcom Dublin was the most friendly place I have ever worked at, probably partially because of the Irish influence. Sadly I’m in contact with very few people from there, but there were some amazingly smart people there.”

Tabitha, Brains and Tempest, may slip further into the ether of gaming history with each passing year but their very existence is resounding proof, if needed, that Ireland has the talent to create console games to compete on an international scale. Funcom Dublin was no freak of nature; perhaps instead a unique precursor to what still lies ahead.

*****************
Postscript:

Pavel Barter talks to Matthew Lloyd, Funcom Dublin veteran

How did you get the job with Funcom Ireland?
“I knew about Funcom from reading a newspaper article about them. I was a student in Ballyfermot College of Further Education at the time, studying computer animation and thought ‘this place is right up my alley’ I started out as a graphic designer but moved on to in-game modelling.”

What are your memories of the rest of the team?
“ I worked with one of the most talented group of people I have known. I was sad to say goodbye to them all. I learned so much there.”

In terms of the working environment, were your offices impressive?
We started out in Clonskeagh in a medium sized office. A couple of years later we moved into a larger office in Sandyford. It did always seem a bit cramped but that’s because we all needed a lot of space to stand our Star Wars figures.”

What were the advantages and disadvantages for a developer based in Dublin?
“The main advantage was the fact that we were the only company developing games in Dublin at all. There was only a few of us in there and you had to know your stuff to get in. However if the only games company in Dublin goes under then you are in a bit of a state trying to find work. ‘Would you like fries with that?’”

In your opinion, why did Funcom Ireland eventually close?
“Because of ‘over spending’ on behalf of the Norway office and the great wisdom that the Xbox ‘would not produce the goods for online gaming’.”

When did you leave and what did you go on to do next?
“I didn’t leave willingly. We were all told on a Tuesday that the company would be going in liquidation with the loss of all jobs and we had to clear our desks by Thursday: don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out! I was very fortunate to land on my feet, and soon after being made redundant landed my current job as a teacher in Computer Animation and 3d Modelling in Ballfermot College of Further Education.”

More info on Funcom

Did you work in Funcom? Share your memories with us on the forums. See under general discussions.

Author’s Bio: Pavel Barter is a freelance journalist based in Dublin and a regular contributor to gd.ie.

Fun Anyone? – 2

Tabitha, Brains, Tempest: names which don’t exactly trip off the tongue like Gordon Freeman, Solid Snake or Jack Carver. Still, around the turn of the millennium, these pixilated scamps were familiar to thousands of young PlayStation fans. They were the Speed Freaks, stars of a wobbly kart racer awash with effervescent eye candy; and you can forget about their cod American accents because these cartoon critters were Dubs through and through. From a global perspective, Funcom Dublin (the birthplace of Speed Freaks) was a mere blip on the development radar, but in the history of Irish development its significance is far greater. For the first time, Irish developers began crafting entertainment for the PlayStation generation. What’s more, their games weren’t half bad.

Funcom’s genesis was in colder climates. In 1993, the company formed in Oslo and began work on two projects, A Dinosaur’s Tale and Daze Before Christmas. The following year, while production continued in Norway, Funcom Dublin Ltd. was set up with 20 employees and a contract for an early PlayStation title, Impact Racing. Jørgen Tharaldsen, Funcom Product Director recalls the reasons behind the creation of an Irish premises. “We decided to set up an office in Dublin because of several factors, one of the most important being the art resources in the city. We saw the need to have a department within Funcom which could specialise in console games. While looking for interesting places we naturally explored every detail from recruitment to rent, wages, taxes and more. We chose Ireland in the end… there were mostly advantages, as we saw it, compared to many other places. ”

image2

Having found a suitable office on Furze Road in Dublin’s Sandyford Industrial Estate, Funcom set about recruiting staff, many from design courses at the National College of Art and Design in Dun Laoghaire and Ballyfermot PLC. “We recruited locally, actually there were (almost) no Norwegians working at the Irish office,” says Jørgen. Senior Software Engineer Gareth Lewin, who joined the company a few years into its incarnation, hailed from further afield. “I started working on game development in Israel. The Israeli game development industry is very tough, and after moving from failed company to failed company I started looking for jobs abroad. I tried the USA, but due to Visa problems, that wasn’t a real option. I was very much into MMORPG’s, so I sent an email to Funcom (who were developing Anarchy Online at the time) and got a response that the Dublin studio wanted to interview me. I went for an interview, it went well, and I relocated to lovely Dublin.”

In 1998 a publishing deal was struck with Activision for a scrambler motor-racer called D.I.R.T. The deal fell through but the game steamed ahead and the following year the newly monikered Championship Motocross featuring Ricky Carmichael was released under THQ’s mantle. “We also released a 2001 version of this series. I am very proud of the realistic control we were able to get into this title, and still think this was the best motorcross game which was released for PS1,” says Jørgen. The next project to be released was Speed Freaks, in August 1999. The game had been picked up by Sony Corporation, under a deal wherby Funcom would receive royalties on each copy sold as well as a lump sum fee. It was launched in North America, under the title Speed Punks, in early 2000. “The game was geared towards a younger audience and got rave reviews. It was considered by journalists to be the best karting game on the PS1, competing against games like Crash Bandicoot Racing, Mario Kart on Nintendo’s platform and others.”

image3

In July 2000, buoyed by the success of these two PlayStation titles, Funcom announced that its Irish branch would now focus resources on the (then mysterious) Xbox platform. By this time the Dublin office employed 25. “After evaluating the Playstation 2 and the Xbox technology for several months we have taken the strategic decision to go for Microsoft’s new gaming console,” Funcom President, Andre Backen, said at the time. “We believe that Xbox has significant market potential due to both cutting edge technology and Microsoft’s marketing muscle. On top of that, exploiting the new technology reduces our development cycle by several months, which also cuts development costs by approximately 20%.”

But in Norway changes were afoot and the writing was on the wall for Funcom Dublin. The Irish studio only developed console titles but Funcom had seen considerable success with online products like Backgammon and Paradigm Shift (1997), Funcom Hearts and Funcom Spades (1998). By the end of 1999, almost 20,000 games of Backgammon were played every week on Funcom’s site. The potential for massively multi-player online games was now coming to fruition and
Funcom Norway began work on the largest project it had ever undertaken. The result, Anarchy Online, was an ambitious sci-fi RPG – a huge success but also a huge investment, and for the Irish team there were disastrous repercussions. The office closed in August 2001 after six years and three unique successful projects.

“We had to close the studio in order to put all focus on Anarchy Online,” Jørgen Tharaldsen contends. “It was not an easy decision to make, but seeing that we are performing very well again today, while also being back in the console production area, I guess you can say it was the right decision. Like many other game developers we faced some rough times, and we had to focus on what we thought would benefit the entire company the most. Seeing we spent some €17m on the development of Anarchy Online before launch I guess you can say it was easy to put the focus on the MMOG side of our business.”

image4

Sadly, Funcom Dublin’s only Xbox project – Jet Sprint MX – was abandoned, despite being close to completion and looking a good deal slicker than most next gen speed boat competition. The various programmers, artists, and other staff members flittered off to other jobs in Ireland and throughout the world. As for Funcom, the company is set to launch Dreamfall – the sequel to Funcom Norway’s The Longest Journey (1999), considered by many to be the greatest graphic adventure of all time. The company now has branches in Switzerland and North America. Today there are no hard feelings about the company’s closure, either from former employees or Funcom. For Gareth Lewin, who recently worked on Microsoft’s Sudeki, the memories are “very fond. Funcom Dublin was the most friendly place I have ever worked at, probably partially because of the Irish influence. Sadly I’m in contact with very few people from there, but there were some amazingly smart people there.”

Tabitha, Brains and Tempest, may slip further into the ether of gaming history with each passing year but their very existence is resounding proof, if needed, that Ireland has the talent to create console games to compete on an international scale. Funcom Dublin was no freak of nature; perhaps instead a unique precursor to what still lies ahead.

*****************
Postscript:

Pavel Barter talks to Matthew Lloyd, Funcom Dublin veteran

How did you get the job with Funcom Ireland?
“I knew about Funcom from reading a newspaper article about them. I was a student in Ballyfermot College of Further Education at the time, studying computer animation and thought ‘this place is right up my alley’ I started out as a graphic designer but moved on to in-game modelling.”

What are your memories of the rest of the team?
“ I worked with one of the most talented group of people I have known. I was sad to say goodbye to them all. I learned so much there.”

In terms of the working environment, were your offices impressive?
We started out in Clonskeagh in a medium sized office. A couple of years later we moved into a larger office in Sandyford. It did always seem a bit cramped but that’s because we all needed a lot of space to stand our Star Wars figures.”

What were the advantages and disadvantages for a developer based in Dublin?
“The main advantage was the fact that we were the only company developing games in Dublin at all. There was only a few of us in there and you had to know your stuff to get in. However if the only games company in Dublin goes under then you are in a bit of a state trying to find work. ‘Would you like fries with that?’”

In your opinion, why did Funcom Ireland eventually close?
“Because of ‘over spending’ on behalf of the Norway office and the great wisdom that the Xbox ‘would not produce the goods for online gaming’.”

When did you leave and what did you go on to do next?
“I didn’t leave willingly. We were all told on a Tuesday that the company would be going in liquidation with the loss of all jobs and we had to clear our desks by Thursday: don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out! I was very fortunate to land on my feet, and soon after being made redundant landed my current job as a teacher in Computer Animation and 3d Modelling in Ballfermot College of Further Education.”

More info on Funcom

Did you work in Funcom? Share your memories with us on the forums. See under general discussions.

Author’s Bio: Pavel Barter is a freelance journalist based in Dublin and a regular contributor to gd.ie.

Closing Date For Digital Media Awards

This year the Digital Media awards are open to Irish and international companies.

In a change from last year there are now seven umbrella categories:

A) Education
B) Digital Media Innovation
C) Websites
D) Wireless
E) Content
F) Business
G) Creativity
H) Special Award
I) Grand Prix Award

Content includes a category for games which Eirplay won last year.

Entries can be made online and entry into some categories, including games. requires payment of a fee. You have been warned..

More info: entryform.htmlentryform.html

Closing Date For Digital Media Awards – 2

This year the Digital Media awards are open to Irish and international companies.

In a change from last year there are now seven umbrella categories:

A) Education
B) Digital Media Innovation
C) Websites
D) Wireless
E) Content
F) Business
G) Creativity
H) Special Award
I) Grand Prix Award

Content includes a category for games which Eirplay won last year.

Entries can be made online and entry into some categories, including games. requires payment of a fee. You have been warned..

More info: entryform.htmlentryform.html

Review Of Galway Games Conference

Star Cave Studios. Galway, hosted the event, which was specifically designed to promote game development in Galway and throughout Ireland in general. The event boasted a rich array of speakers. Keith Killilea of Starcave kicked things off when he presented a video of Starcave’s latest project “Camelot Galway – City of The Tribes”. This video can now be downloaded from the following location: video.zip video.zip (41 MB .zip file)

The team behind the project was then introduced. Ray Montey an artist at Starcave demonstrated the process used to create characters and other world objects from concept art to finished 3D. Programmer Pearse Fitzpatrick provided details of the team’s experience working with the Torque Engine, from Garage Games, and the methods used to integrate content into the engine.

Alan Duggan of Nephin Games then took to the podium and introduced his upcoming mobile game Kick Boxing Network – KBN. Alan also spoke about how the majority of phone owners have similar phone models and the necessity to build games for that market. Alan also pointed out that thirty something females are the biggest market demographic when it comes to downloadable mobile games. Claire Fitch, sitting in the audience looked suitably relieved. Alan went on to speak about his experience of the recent trade mission to Korea and offered encouragement to budding mobile game designers in the audience by stating that Ireland was not as far behind Korea, technologically, as one might think.

Next there was an energetic presentation from Hewlett Packard that looked at how different individual marketing trends merge to create new trends and patterns such as infotainment. Game developers were urged to focus on niche markets and praise was given to Starcave Studios for pursuing tourism and educational markets.

Then came the big surprise of the day when the deputy Mayor of Galway exposed himself to be an avid gamer with a lack of free-time…but the shocks didn’t stop there. The deputy mayor went on to reveal that he was once a former game developer, having successfully developed a Commodore 64 game that he later went on to sell, although the deputy mayor would not say for how much.

Michael Kenna from Enterprise Ireland gave a positive overview of the recent Trade Mission to Korea. He highlighted the differences between the Irish and Korean games industries including that fact that Ireland has 21 known game developers in Ireland while Korea has 2,500. Michael also talked about the popularity of online gaming in the region. In addition, Michael discussed the need to set up clusters of talent here and for game development studios to work together.

Jackey O’Dwyer, an investor from Galway, talked briefly about her role in the funding of the development of Camelot Galway and also on the importance of putting a games-centric investor forum together. NUIG presented a virtual space for the students including a study space, message boards and social / recreational areas.

Finally, Neil Leyden, Chairman of the Digital Media Forum rounded up proceedings nicely with a well-crafted and entertaining presentation on the crossovers between the film and the games industries in Ireland. He also discussed section 481 and suggested ways that the games industry might go about obtaining it. Also in attendance were representatives of the Chamber of Commerce of Ireland and Ireland West Tourism.

Review Of Galway Games Conference – 2

Star Cave Studios. Galway, hosted the event, which was specifically designed to promote game development in Galway and throughout Ireland in general. The event boasted a rich array of speakers. Keith Killilea of Starcave kicked things off when he presented a video of Starcave’s latest project “Camelot Galway – City of The Tribes”. This video can now be downloaded from the following location: video.zip video.zip (41 MB .zip file)

The team behind the project was then introduced. Ray Montey an artist at Starcave demonstrated the process used to create characters and other world objects from concept art to finished 3D. Programmer Pearse Fitzpatrick provided details of the team’s experience working with the Torque Engine, from Garage Games, and the methods used to integrate content into the engine.

Alan Duggan of Nephin Games then took to the podium and introduced his upcoming mobile game Kick Boxing Network – KBN. Alan also spoke about how the majority of phone owners have similar phone models and the necessity to build games for that market. Alan also pointed out that thirty something females are the biggest market demographic when it comes to downloadable mobile games. Claire Fitch, sitting in the audience looked suitably relieved. Alan went on to speak about his experience of the recent trade mission to Korea and offered encouragement to budding mobile game designers in the audience by stating that Ireland was not as far behind Korea, technologically, as one might think.

Next there was an energetic presentation from Hewlett Packard that looked at how different individual marketing trends merge to create new trends and patterns such as infotainment. Game developers were urged to focus on niche markets and praise was given to Starcave Studios for pursuing tourism and educational markets.

Then came the big surprise of the day when the deputy Mayor of Galway exposed himself to be an avid gamer with a lack of free-time…but the shocks didn’t stop there. The deputy mayor went on to reveal that he was once a former game developer, having successfully developed a Commodore 64 game that he later went on to sell, although the deputy mayor would not say for how much.

Michael Kenna from Enterprise Ireland gave a positive overview of the recent Trade Mission to Korea. He highlighted the differences between the Irish and Korean games industries including that fact that Ireland has 21 known game developers in Ireland while Korea has 2,500. Michael also talked about the popularity of online gaming in the region. In addition, Michael discussed the need to set up clusters of talent here and for game development studios to work together.

Jackey O’Dwyer, an investor from Galway, talked briefly about her role in the funding of the development of Camelot Galway and also on the importance of putting a games-centric investor forum together. NUIG presented a virtual space for the students including a study space, message boards and social / recreational areas.

Finally, Neil Leyden, Chairman of the Digital Media Forum rounded up proceedings nicely with a well-crafted and entertaining presentation on the crossovers between the film and the games industries in Ireland. He also discussed section 481 and suggested ways that the games industry might go about obtaining it. Also in attendance were representatives of the Chamber of Commerce of Ireland and Ireland West Tourism.

Christmas Shindig (Weekend)

The December Dublin Shindig will be held on the 17th of Dec. in the usual venue of Toners on Baggott Street. There is a rumour around that it will be spread over the two nights so don’t say you haven’t been warned.

As usual all are welcome to attend – shindigs are just informal pub meets where developers, academics, students and others with a general interest in games meet. Please do also bring partners and/or friends if they are interested at all in the area – the more the merrier..

As the pub is likely to be fairly busy it is advised that you try to arrive early! Tables will be reserved for us as usual but there is nothing like physical presence to keep em!

Entertainment provided by everyone and maybe we can persuade Mal to bring his fiddle! I hear he puts on a fine show!? Or maybe if some of the Torc crew are down there might be some singers or guitar players amongst them..

Time: From 7.00pm onwards

Location: Downstairs in Toners pub on Baggott Street in Dublin. A couple of tables will have reserved signs on them.

Directions: From Stephen’s Green North walk past the Shelbourne Hotel and towards Merrion Row/Baggot Street. Keep walking straight with Upper Merrion Street on your left and Ely Place on your right. Toners is a wine & black pub and will be on your right on a corner. If you reach Pembroke Street. on your right you have passed it and gone too far.

The shindig will be downstairs. To get there you can walk through the pub to the back where there is a stairs or walk around the side outside where there is another door. I will put up signs so you know where you are going..

Still unsure? The address is 139 Baggot Street Lower.

check your route here
dublin/maps/p52s54.htmlwww.softguides.com/dublin/maps/p52s54.html

Christmas Shindig (Weekend) – 2

The December Dublin Shindig will be held on the 17th of Dec. in the usual venue of Toners on Baggott Street. There is a rumour around that it will be spread over the two nights so don’t say you haven’t been warned.

As usual all are welcome to attend – shindigs are just informal pub meets where developers, academics, students and others with a general interest in games meet. Please do also bring partners and/or friends if they are interested at all in the area – the more the merrier..

As the pub is likely to be fairly busy it is advised that you try to arrive early! Tables will be reserved for us as usual but there is nothing like physical presence to keep em!

Entertainment provided by everyone and maybe we can persuade Mal to bring his fiddle! I hear he puts on a fine show!? Or maybe if some of the Torc crew are down there might be some singers or guitar players amongst them..

Time: From 7.00pm onwards

Location: Downstairs in Toners pub on Baggott Street in Dublin. A couple of tables will have reserved signs on them.

Directions: From Stephen’s Green North walk past the Shelbourne Hotel and towards Merrion Row/Baggot Street. Keep walking straight with Upper Merrion Street on your left and Ely Place on your right. Toners is a wine & black pub and will be on your right on a corner. If you reach Pembroke Street. on your right you have passed it and gone too far.

The shindig will be downstairs. To get there you can walk through the pub to the back where there is a stairs or walk around the side outside where there is another door. I will put up signs so you know where you are going..

Still unsure? The address is 139 Baggot Street Lower.

check your route here
dublin/maps/p52s54.htmlwww.softguides.com/dublin/maps/p52s54.html

Ni Research Funding

The DTI’s Technology Programme is aimed at encouraging innovation and research. The November call details a number of research themes including design, simulation and modelling for which £17M is available and pervasive computing for which £9M is available. In both of these streams creative industries and or game companies are encouraged to submit research proposals.

The Technology Programme is aimed at academic/business and business/business collaborations and both applied and experimental research projects.

Projects can run from 1-3 years and apply for up to £1M.

Deadline for intention to submit applications is the 31st of Jan.

Deadline for applications is the 7th of Feb. 2005

More info: http://www.dti.gov.uk/technologyprogramme/open_comps.htmlhere

Ni Research Funding – 2

The DTI’s Technology Programme is aimed at encouraging innovation and research. The November call details a number of research themes including design, simulation and modelling for which £17M is available and pervasive computing for which £9M is available. In both of these streams creative industries and or game companies are encouraged to submit research proposals.

The Technology Programme is aimed at academic/business and business/business collaborations and both applied and experimental research projects.

Projects can run from 1-3 years and apply for up to £1M.

Deadline for intention to submit applications is the 31st of Jan.

Deadline for applications is the 7th of Feb. 2005

More info: http://www.dti.gov.uk/technologyprogramme/open_comps.htmlhere