Starcave Expands

Starcave, a game development company based in Galway, have recently hired new staff and taken on some interns. Gd.ie got in contact to ask them what was going on and who the new staff are?

Niamh Breslin has taken up the role of Business Manager, specialising in PR and Marketing activities. She has previously worked for Localisation and Testing companies both here and in Asia for a number of years. StarCave have also hired Feargal Plant, a 3D artist who has previously worked with Rare, and Eoghan Quigley, a 3D animator who has joined from Blitz games. The company also have 8 interns working for them.

According to Keith Killilea, CEO StarCave “StarCave Studios has entered its 2nd year of full time game development operations. We are attracting the best of Irish game development talent who have industry experience and have been working abroad. StarCave is also half way through its Internship program with incredible success to date. Two teams were formed to create 2 casual game demos, which will be shown off at the official StarCave Studios Press Launch & Birthday party event in August. The quality of the work is outstanding, considering the time constraints and non-experience in games development. Our Internship educational program is based around the Torque Game Engine”.

Niamh’s first task will be to launch ‘Camelot Galway –City of the Tribes’, a budget range computer game/adventure tour on Wednesday 10th August, 2005, at 7pm in Screen 7 of the Eye Cinema, Wellpark Retail Park, Galway. Tickets are limited but if you wish to attend please contact Niamh. Full details below.

The launch will be held in conjunction with the 1st birthday celebrations of StarCave & the official launch of the company as an independent computer games developer based in the Galway Technology Centre in Mervue.

A press release for Starcave indicated that the game will be sold online and in local retailing outlets.

StarCave currently has 3 satellite teams in the USA, Brazil & Australia, with 3 budget range games due to be released in 2005 & all will be shown at this event. StarCave is privately funded & is Irish owned.

StarCave also recently acquired the Reality 3D engine and will shortly begin development of a “AAA” title called ‘The 14 Tribes’ for PC & Microsoft XBox 360.

For further info contact:
Niamh Breslin,
PR & Marketing Manager,
StarCave Studios,
Unit 10, Galway Technology Centre, Mervue Business Park, Galway
Tel: (091)745583/(087) 9301550
Email: niamh@starcave.com
Website: http://www.starcave.com

Starcave Expands – 2

Starcave, a game development company based in Galway, have recently hired new staff and taken on some interns. Gd.ie got in contact to ask them what was going on and who the new staff are?

Niamh Breslin has taken up the role of Business Manager, specialising in PR and Marketing activities. She has previously worked for Localisation and Testing companies both here and in Asia for a number of years. StarCave have also hired Feargal Plant, a 3D artist who has previously worked with Rare, and Eoghan Quigley, a 3D animator who has joined from Blitz games. The company also have 8 interns working for them.

According to Keith Killilea, CEO StarCave “StarCave Studios has entered its 2nd year of full time game development operations. We are attracting the best of Irish game development talent who have industry experience and have been working abroad. StarCave is also half way through its Internship program with incredible success to date. Two teams were formed to create 2 casual game demos, which will be shown off at the official StarCave Studios Press Launch & Birthday party event in August. The quality of the work is outstanding, considering the time constraints and non-experience in games development. Our Internship educational program is based around the Torque Game Engine”.

Niamh’s first task will be to launch ‘Camelot Galway –City of the Tribes’, a budget range computer game/adventure tour on Wednesday 10th August, 2005, at 7pm in Screen 7 of the Eye Cinema, Wellpark Retail Park, Galway. Tickets are limited but if you wish to attend please contact Niamh. Full details below.

The launch will be held in conjunction with the 1st birthday celebrations of StarCave & the official launch of the company as an independent computer games developer based in the Galway Technology Centre in Mervue.

A press release for Starcave indicated that the game will be sold online and in local retailing outlets.

StarCave currently has 3 satellite teams in the USA, Brazil & Australia, with 3 budget range games due to be released in 2005 & all will be shown at this event. StarCave is privately funded & is Irish owned.

StarCave also recently acquired the Reality 3D engine and will shortly begin development of a “AAA” title called ‘The 14 Tribes’ for PC & Microsoft XBox 360.

For further info contact:
Niamh Breslin,
PR & Marketing Manager,
StarCave Studios,
Unit 10, Galway Technology Centre, Mervue Business Park, Galway
Tel: (091)745583/(087) 9301550
Email: niamh@starcave.com
Website: http://www.starcave.com

Igda Ireland & Eurographics 05

Observant readers will have noticed that Eurographics is being held in Trinity College Dublin this year. The IGDA Ireland chapter is sponsoring an industry games session on Wed. 31st August, 2-4pm, 2005.

The IGDA/industry session will include two talks and a panel discussion

Talk #1:
Overview of Java Mobile Graphics Technology
Peter Lynch (Eirplay Games)

Talk #2:
Realtime Graphics for Games: An Overview of the Instinct Engine
Chris Gregan (Torc Interactive)

Panel:
Graphics vs. Gameplay? Why We Play Games

Moderated by Aphra Kerr (Gamedevelopers.ie)

Panellists: Tony Kelly (Torc Interactive/IGDA Ireland), Ian Hannigan (Nephin Games), Hamish Carr (UCD), Mike McNeill (UoU) + TBD

Other game related sessions (not sponsored by IGDA/GD) include talks from Steve Collins from Havok, as well as sessions from Sony on COLLADA, ATI on Overview of the Xbox360 GPU and a panel on Next Generation Game Technology.

More info: http://isg.cs.tcd.ie/eg2005/

Futureplay 05,

FuturePlay 2005, the International Academic Conference on the Future
of Game Design and Technology, takes place October 13-15, 2005 in
East Lansing, MI in the US on the campus of Michigan State University. (Looks like a good opportunity for artistic, experimental and student projects.Deadlines for papers and posters, end of July, Deadline for game submissions Sept 9th.- Aphra)

The games exhibition showcases peer-reviewed competition of games in three categories: Future (experimental) Games, Serious Games, and Student Games.

Game submission deadline is September 9th, 2005.

GAME SUBMISSION DETAILS:
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=64

The Future Play conference focuses on three main themes. The first
theme, future game development, addresses academic research and
emerging industry trends in the area of game technology and game
design. The second theme, future game impacts and applications,
includes academic research and emerging industry trends focused on designing games for learning, for gender, for serious purposes, and to impact society. Finally, the third theme, future game talent, is designed to provide a number of industry and academic perspectives on the knowledge, skills, and attitude it takes to excel in the games industry.

Future Play addresses these issues through exciting and thought-
provoking keynotes from leaders in academia and industry, peer-
reviewed paper sessions, panel
sessions (including academic and
industry discussions), workshops (including design, technology, and
career workshops), and exhibitions of posters, games, and the latest
game technologies and supports from industry-leading vendors.

The deadline for FuturePlay 2005 academic papers and posters is July 31st, 2005.

ACADEMIC PAPER SUBMISSION DETAILS:
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=62

ACADEMIC POSTER SUBMISSION DETAILS
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=65

Details on FuturePlay are available at http://www.futureplay.org/

Igda Ireland & Eurographics 05 – 2

Observant readers will have noticed that Eurographics is being held in Trinity College Dublin this year. The IGDA Ireland chapter is sponsoring an industry games session on Wed. 31st August, 2-4pm, 2005.

The IGDA/industry session will include two talks and a panel discussion

Talk #1:
Overview of Java Mobile Graphics Technology
Peter Lynch (Eirplay Games)

Talk #2:
Realtime Graphics for Games: An Overview of the Instinct Engine
Chris Gregan (Torc Interactive)

Panel:
Graphics vs. Gameplay? Why We Play Games

Moderated by Aphra Kerr (Gamedevelopers.ie)

Panellists: Tony Kelly (Torc Interactive/IGDA Ireland), Ian Hannigan (Nephin Games), Hamish Carr (UCD), Mike McNeill (UoU) + TBD

Other game related sessions (not sponsored by IGDA/GD) include talks from Steve Collins from Havok, as well as sessions from Sony on COLLADA, ATI on Overview of the Xbox360 GPU and a panel on Next Generation Game Technology.

More info: http://isg.cs.tcd.ie/eg2005/

Futureplay 05, – 2

FuturePlay 2005, the International Academic Conference on the Future
of Game Design and Technology, takes place October 13-15, 2005 in
East Lansing, MI in the US on the campus of Michigan State University. (Looks like a good opportunity for artistic, experimental and student projects.Deadlines for papers and posters, end of July, Deadline for game submissions Sept 9th.- Aphra)

The games exhibition showcases peer-reviewed competition of games in three categories: Future (experimental) Games, Serious Games, and Student Games.

Game submission deadline is September 9th, 2005.

GAME SUBMISSION DETAILS:
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=64

The Future Play conference focuses on three main themes. The first
theme, future game development, addresses academic research and
emerging industry trends in the area of game technology and game
design. The second theme, future game impacts and applications,
includes academic research and emerging industry trends focused on designing games for learning, for gender, for serious purposes, and to impact society. Finally, the third theme, future game talent, is designed to provide a number of industry and academic perspectives on the knowledge, skills, and attitude it takes to excel in the games industry.

Future Play addresses these issues through exciting and thought-
provoking keynotes from leaders in academia and industry, peer-
reviewed paper sessions, panel
sessions (including academic and
industry discussions), workshops (including design, technology, and
career workshops), and exhibitions of posters, games, and the latest
game technologies and supports from industry-leading vendors.

The deadline for FuturePlay 2005 academic papers and posters is July 31st, 2005.

ACADEMIC PAPER SUBMISSION DETAILS:
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=62

ACADEMIC POSTER SUBMISSION DETAILS
http://www.futureplay.org/content.php?pageID=65

Details on FuturePlay are available at http://www.futureplay.org/

Women In Games

The Women in Games 2005 Conference will highlight the most recent, groundbreaking work in this field of computer game research and development to both academic and industrial worlds.

Attended by the giants of the games industry, and giving an insight into a vast emerging market, this is event that you cannot afford to miss!

The Conference will take place on 8th, 9th and 10th August 2005, at the University of Abertay, Dundee. A full pass, including lunch each day and the Conference dinner, costs just £150. Students and the unwaged may apply for a one-day pass for Wednesday 10 August, at a special price of just £40.

Book now on www.womeningames.com to secure your place!

Key speakers confirmed

Some of the most respected names in the industry will take centre stage at the conference. Keynote speakers include Ernest Adams (UK), an independent games designer, teacher, founder of IGDA, and author; Melissa Federoff (US), a Microsoft Games Usability Engineer; Constance A. Steinkuehler (US), a MMORPG researcher and game columnist; and Aphra Kerr (Northern Ireland), a game researcher at the Centre for Media Research, University of Ulster.

Programmed for success

The three days of the conference will include papers on a wide range of issues related to women in games, as well as question and panel sessions, networking opportunities, and presentations from some of the up-and-coming student stars of the future. A conference dinner will be held on Tuesday 9 August 2005.

Highlights of the programme include:

Marketing games to a broader audience, a panel chaired by Aleks Krotoski, which will invite discussion on using fresh marketing approaches to encourage female consumers to engage with interactive entertainment, and how the positions of games marketing will change in the future.

Computer games, play, and the politics of difference, a paper by Professor James Woudhuysen, which will review the naturalistic and consumerist approaches that now dominate commentaries on women and computer games, and propose an alternative outlook.

Thinking past Pink: Critical considerations of women and gaming, a panel chaired by Tina Taylor of the IT University of Copenhagen. The panel will provide several rich micro-accounts about women who do play, and discuss how we might better understand the intersection of gender and computer games through their stories.

For full programme details, visit the website: www.womeningames.com

Student Forum

Win an iPod Shuffle! Registration for the student forum includes entry to the conference prize draw.

As part of the conference, student delegates will have unprecedented access to a panel of industry veterans, who will discuss CVs, interview tips, presenting a demo, and hot games hiring topics. Those attending will also have the opportunity to put their CV forward for discussion and comment from the panel.

The Student Forum will also give the inside track on Dare to be Digital, a unique international student games competition based at the University of Abertay Dundee. Project Manager Jackie McKenzie will give an overview of the past five years of DARE, including a profile of some of the prototypes created.

About Women in Games 2005

Women in Games seeks new opportunities and professional development for women working in and researching into games and the games industry.

The aims of the organisation are to:

Analyse the role of women in the videogame industry,
Discuss the future of games that appeal to female gamers,
Provide an opportunity for women in the videogame industry to network,
Provide an opportunity to present and discuss the latest videogame research.
The conference, now in its second year, is a unique opportunity for delegates to explore this growing market, and hear new research into ways of getting women into games – as both developers and players.

Contact Women in Games 2005 by email at enquiries@womeningames.com

Women In Games – 2

The Women in Games 2005 Conference will highlight the most recent, groundbreaking work in this field of computer game research and development to both academic and industrial worlds.

Attended by the giants of the games industry, and giving an insight into a vast emerging market, this is event that you cannot afford to miss!

The Conference will take place on 8th, 9th and 10th August 2005, at the University of Abertay, Dundee. A full pass, including lunch each day and the Conference dinner, costs just £150. Students and the unwaged may apply for a one-day pass for Wednesday 10 August, at a special price of just £40.

Book now on www.womeningames.com to secure your place!

Key speakers confirmed

Some of the most respected names in the industry will take centre stage at the conference. Keynote speakers include Ernest Adams (UK), an independent games designer, teacher, founder of IGDA, and author; Melissa Federoff (US), a Microsoft Games Usability Engineer; Constance A. Steinkuehler (US), a MMORPG researcher and game columnist; and Aphra Kerr (Northern Ireland), a game researcher at the Centre for Media Research, University of Ulster.

Programmed for success

The three days of the conference will include papers on a wide range of issues related to women in games, as well as question and panel sessions, networking opportunities, and presentations from some of the up-and-coming student stars of the future. A conference dinner will be held on Tuesday 9 August 2005.

Highlights of the programme include:

Marketing games to a broader audience, a panel chaired by Aleks Krotoski, which will invite discussion on using fresh marketing approaches to encourage female consumers to engage with interactive entertainment, and how the positions of games marketing will change in the future.

Computer games, play, and the politics of difference, a paper by Professor James Woudhuysen, which will review the naturalistic and consumerist approaches that now dominate commentaries on women and computer games, and propose an alternative outlook.

Thinking past Pink: Critical considerations of women and gaming, a panel chaired by Tina Taylor of the IT University of Copenhagen. The panel will provide several rich micro-accounts about women who do play, and discuss how we might better understand the intersection of gender and computer games through their stories.

For full programme details, visit the website: www.womeningames.com

Student Forum

Win an iPod Shuffle! Registration for the student forum includes entry to the conference prize draw.

As part of the conference, student delegates will have unprecedented access to a panel of industry veterans, who will discuss CVs, interview tips, presenting a demo, and hot games hiring topics. Those attending will also have the opportunity to put their CV forward for discussion and comment from the panel.

The Student Forum will also give the inside track on Dare to be Digital, a unique international student games competition based at the University of Abertay Dundee. Project Manager Jackie McKenzie will give an overview of the past five years of DARE, including a profile of some of the prototypes created.

About Women in Games 2005

Women in Games seeks new opportunities and professional development for women working in and researching into games and the games industry.

The aims of the organisation are to:

Analyse the role of women in the videogame industry,
Discuss the future of games that appeal to female gamers,
Provide an opportunity for women in the videogame industry to network,
Provide an opportunity to present and discuss the latest videogame research.
The conference, now in its second year, is a unique opportunity for delegates to explore this growing market, and hear new research into ways of getting women into games – as both developers and players.

Contact Women in Games 2005 by email at enquiries@womeningames.com

A Glimpse Into The Future At Wired’S Nextfest

Wired magazine is the most popular technology magazine in the U.S. circulating almost one million hard-copy issues every month and read by millions more online. In 2004 the magazine ventured into uncharted territory by convening its first ever NextFest festival in San Francisco. The objective was to mimic the old-fashioned World Fairs where innovators exhibited and traded some of the ideas that would shape the future and the way people live their lives.

The first Nextfest was a roaring success, visited by 25,000 people over the course of a single weekend and the 2005 event was planned as an even more ambitious occasion. The venue changed to the massive Navy Pier centre in Chicago and more exhibitors in a greater number of categories were invited. This time, over thirty thousand people visited over the weekend to experience future technologies from industries as diverse as health, exploration and, of course, entertainment.

The “Playground”, or entertainment pavillion accomodated nearly 20 different exhibits from the digital entertainment sector. Everything from humanoid robots to human pacman were included but the dominant theme seemed to be the search for new ways to interact with games and the digital world in general. Of course, new interfaces can be taken to impractical extremes, but that’s exactly what NextFest is about; pushing the envelope of new technologies. Here are some of the gaming highlights from the festival.

Gamerunner
One way to change the way we interact with the games we play is to simply develop a new controller. Gamerunner takes first person shooters and gives them a whole new level of immersion.

Basically, it’s a treadmill with handlebars. The deck of the treadmill is sloped to provide resistance and the handlebars, which turn just like a bike, have triggers attached to which the player can assign actions.

Load up your favourite FPS and you simply walk or run on the treadmill to propel yourself along in the game. The handlebars do the turning. Suddenly hours of playing Half-Life 2 becomes as demanding on the body as on the nerves, but one thing’s for sure, it’ll keep gamers fit. This author felt he’d gone a few rounds in the ring after ten minutes of Quake on the Gamerunner.

It’s the stuff of schoolyard conversations, in fact, most of us probably thought of this exact device when we were about ten. But hats off to the developers because it works like a dream.
image2

Virsual: The Digital Rocking Horse
To develop a game controller for an existing game is one thing, but to take an existing toy, turn it into a controller, and develop an entirely original game for your new platform is another thing entirely.

Virsual is a thing of great beauty. A small, clean, cute looking rocking horse, like a futuristic toy from a Spielberg movie. And alone, it is just that, a beautiful toy. But connected via RF to the Virsual game, it becomes a game controller and a means to explore a virtual world. The faster the player rocks on the horse the faster they move through the game, as the head turns – so does the in game action.

The beauty of the Virsual’s design is undisputable and attracted many to the exhibit at NextFest. But the fun didn’t stop there as the visual style, graphical quality and playability of the Virsual game were captivating. All credit to the Australian design team who in conversation admitted to achieving all this with only two full time staff!
image3

Blowaway: The Winds of Therslow
In among the interface innovators was Irish contribution “Blowaway: The Winds of Therslow”. Some gd.ie readers may remember this project from the birthday party last April. Blowaway is aimed at the younger audiences, and topples the myth that games discourage teamwork.

The objective of the game is to steer a hot air balloon across the four islands of Therslow while collecting lost Sunbeams. The players must work as a team using only their breath to carry the ballon along the correct course. Each player blows into a custom built sensor in order to play.

This author is loathe to exaggerate the projects success due to his own involvement but this was the first time the game has really been exposed to lots (and I mean lots!) of children and reaction was really positive with some kids taking up residence at the exhibit for more than a couple of hours.

Kick Ass Kung Fu
There were many projects on display that utilized Eye-Toy style image tracking to allow players immerse themselves in a game environment using a webcam. But none surpassed the scale and quality of Kick Ass Kung Fu, developed by Finnish outfit Animaatiokone Industries.

The player takes weapon of choice and stands on a playing mat positioned between two large screens. The game detects the players presence and starts up. Realtime image tracking and video keying puts the player into a kung-fu beat-‘em up game. The two screens allow the player to work through 360 degrees and exagerrated physics put Crouching Tiger style moves within the reach of most of us.

This game really has to be seen to be believed. It is an incredible amount of fun, a real physical challenge, and technologically, is on the cutting edge of image tracking which is an area being explored by most of the major software and hardware developers in gaming today.

Among the best of the rest was Brainball, the now famous game where you have to “Relax to Win” using a measurement of your brain activity pitched against that of your opponent.

I haven’t touched on most of the Playground exhibits and have completely ignored the assortment of flying cars, petrol-powered dolphins, 360 degree cinema screens and unmanned military aircraft that were on display. Links are provided below for further information.

NextFest will get bigger again next year and will move to the East coast and New York City. Anyone in the area is strongly advised to grab a ticket for a whole lot of fun with the technologies of the future.

Featured Links:
Wired NextFest – http://www.nextfest.net/
Gamerunner – http://www.gamerunner.com/
Virsual – http://www.virsual.com/
Kick Ass Kung Fu – http://www.kickasskungfu.net/
Blowaway – http://www.blowaway.org/

Other great exhibits:
Skycar – http://www.moller.com/skycar/
Brainball – http://smart.tii.se/smart/projects/brainball/index_en.html
Playmotion – http://www.playmotion.com/
Innespace Dolphin Vehicle – http://www.innespace.com/

Author Bio:
John Lynch teaches on the games course in Ballyfermot Senior College in Dublin and was one of the team behind the design and development of ‘Blowaway’ (despite his modesty above!). John was also one of the initial designers behind gd.ie. Contact him via the forums where his nickname is Johnnyslim.

A Glimpse Into The Future At Wired’S Nextfest – 2

Wired magazine is the most popular technology magazine in the U.S. circulating almost one million hard-copy issues every month and read by millions more online. In 2004 the magazine ventured into uncharted territory by convening its first ever NextFest festival in San Francisco. The objective was to mimic the old-fashioned World Fairs where innovators exhibited and traded some of the ideas that would shape the future and the way people live their lives.

The first Nextfest was a roaring success, visited by 25,000 people over the course of a single weekend and the 2005 event was planned as an even more ambitious occasion. The venue changed to the massive Navy Pier centre in Chicago and more exhibitors in a greater number of categories were invited. This time, over thirty thousand people visited over the weekend to experience future technologies from industries as diverse as health, exploration and, of course, entertainment.

The “Playground”, or entertainment pavillion accomodated nearly 20 different exhibits from the digital entertainment sector. Everything from humanoid robots to human pacman were included but the dominant theme seemed to be the search for new ways to interact with games and the digital world in general. Of course, new interfaces can be taken to impractical extremes, but that’s exactly what NextFest is about; pushing the envelope of new technologies. Here are some of the gaming highlights from the festival.

Gamerunner
One way to change the way we interact with the games we play is to simply develop a new controller. Gamerunner takes first person shooters and gives them a whole new level of immersion.

Basically, it’s a treadmill with handlebars. The deck of the treadmill is sloped to provide resistance and the handlebars, which turn just like a bike, have triggers attached to which the player can assign actions.

Load up your favourite FPS and you simply walk or run on the treadmill to propel yourself along in the game. The handlebars do the turning. Suddenly hours of playing Half-Life 2 becomes as demanding on the body as on the nerves, but one thing’s for sure, it’ll keep gamers fit. This author felt he’d gone a few rounds in the ring after ten minutes of Quake on the Gamerunner.

It’s the stuff of schoolyard conversations, in fact, most of us probably thought of this exact device when we were about ten. But hats off to the developers because it works like a dream.
image2

Virsual: The Digital Rocking Horse
To develop a game controller for an existing game is one thing, but to take an existing toy, turn it into a controller, and develop an entirely original game for your new platform is another thing entirely.

Virsual is a thing of great beauty. A small, clean, cute looking rocking horse, like a futuristic toy from a Spielberg movie. And alone, it is just that, a beautiful toy. But connected via RF to the Virsual game, it becomes a game controller and a means to explore a virtual world. The faster the player rocks on the horse the faster they move through the game, as the head turns – so does the in game action.

The beauty of the Virsual’s design is undisputable and attracted many to the exhibit at NextFest. But the fun didn’t stop there as the visual style, graphical quality and playability of the Virsual game were captivating. All credit to the Australian design team who in conversation admitted to achieving all this with only two full time staff!
image3

Blowaway: The Winds of Therslow
In among the interface innovators was Irish contribution “Blowaway: The Winds of Therslow”. Some gd.ie readers may remember this project from the birthday party last April. Blowaway is aimed at the younger audiences, and topples the myth that games discourage teamwork.

The objective of the game is to steer a hot air balloon across the four islands of Therslow while collecting lost Sunbeams. The players must work as a team using only their breath to carry the ballon along the correct course. Each player blows into a custom built sensor in order to play.

This author is loathe to exaggerate the projects success due to his own involvement but this was the first time the game has really been exposed to lots (and I mean lots!) of children and reaction was really positive with some kids taking up residence at the exhibit for more than a couple of hours.

Kick Ass Kung Fu
There were many projects on display that utilized Eye-Toy style image tracking to allow players immerse themselves in a game environment using a webcam. But none surpassed the scale and quality of Kick Ass Kung Fu, developed by Finnish outfit Animaatiokone Industries.

The player takes weapon of choice and stands on a playing mat positioned between two large screens. The game detects the players presence and starts up. Realtime image tracking and video keying puts the player into a kung-fu beat-‘em up game. The two screens allow the player to work through 360 degrees and exagerrated physics put Crouching Tiger style moves within the reach of most of us.

This game really has to be seen to be believed. It is an incredible amount of fun, a real physical challenge, and technologically, is on the cutting edge of image tracking which is an area being explored by most of the major software and hardware developers in gaming today.

Among the best of the rest was Brainball, the now famous game where you have to “Relax to Win” using a measurement of your brain activity pitched against that of your opponent.

I haven’t touched on most of the Playground exhibits and have completely ignored the assortment of flying cars, petrol-powered dolphins, 360 degree cinema screens and unmanned military aircraft that were on display. Links are provided below for further information.

NextFest will get bigger again next year and will move to the East coast and New York City. Anyone in the area is strongly advised to grab a ticket for a whole lot of fun with the technologies of the future.

Featured Links:
Wired NextFest – http://www.nextfest.net/
Gamerunner – http://www.gamerunner.com/
Virsual – http://www.virsual.com/
Kick Ass Kung Fu – http://www.kickasskungfu.net/
Blowaway – http://www.blowaway.org/

Other great exhibits:
Skycar – http://www.moller.com/skycar/
Brainball – http://smart.tii.se/smart/projects/brainball/index_en.html
Playmotion – http://www.playmotion.com/
Innespace Dolphin Vehicle – http://www.innespace.com/

Author Bio:
John Lynch teaches on the games course in Ballyfermot Senior College in Dublin and was one of the team behind the design and development of ‘Blowaway’ (despite his modesty above!). John was also one of the initial designers behind gd.ie. Contact him via the forums where his nickname is Johnnyslim.

Igda Student Scholarships

University students will have the opportunity to visit the Game Developers Conference Europe, courtesy of the International Game Developers Association.

Those selected by the IGDA would be able to attend all sessions, roundtables, panels, and keynotes at the GDC Europe. The conference runs from Tuesday, August 30th through Thursday, September 1st at London’s Le Meridien Hotel.

“The annual Student Scholarship program provides students with a peek into the game creation process,” says Jason Della Rocca, executive director of IGDA. “It’s one exciting way the IGDA supports aspiring game creators.”

Interested students must meet the sponsorship’s qualifications, which include full-time enrollment at a university and membership of the IGDA. 10 applicants will be selected. The “scholarship” is actually a Classic Pass to the conference, and provides access to all sessions, roundtables and keynotes. Selected students will be responsible for all expenses (travel, lodging, etc.), although breakfast and lunch will be provided at the conference. The membership application is currently available online.

Closing date for applications is July 20th

see http://www.igda.org/scholarships/

Igda Student Scholarships – 2

University students will have the opportunity to visit the Game Developers Conference Europe, courtesy of the International Game Developers Association.

Those selected by the IGDA would be able to attend all sessions, roundtables, panels, and keynotes at the GDC Europe. The conference runs from Tuesday, August 30th through Thursday, September 1st at London’s Le Meridien Hotel.

“The annual Student Scholarship program provides students with a peek into the game creation process,” says Jason Della Rocca, executive director of IGDA. “It’s one exciting way the IGDA supports aspiring game creators.”

Interested students must meet the sponsorship’s qualifications, which include full-time enrollment at a university and membership of the IGDA. 10 applicants will be selected. The “scholarship” is actually a Classic Pass to the conference, and provides access to all sessions, roundtables and keynotes. Selected students will be responsible for all expenses (travel, lodging, etc.), although breakfast and lunch will be provided at the conference. The membership application is currently available online.

Closing date for applications is July 20th

see http://www.igda.org/scholarships/

Igda Scholarships For Gdce

If you would like to attend GDCE(31st to September 1st, 2005) for free and are a student then you need to submit an application before July 20th.

You submit your scholarship application at the IGDA web site and you are advised to read the complete list of rules and scholarship details before applying.

The IGDA will award 10 university/college students admission to the 2005 Game
Developers Conference Europe, which is being held in London. Scholarship recipients will gain access to conference seminars, panel discussions and potential job opportunities.

http://www.igda.org/scholarships/

Igda Scholarships For Gdce – 2

If you would like to attend GDCE(31st to September 1st, 2005) for free and are a student then you need to submit an application before July 20th.

You submit your scholarship application at the IGDA web site and you are advised to read the complete list of rules and scholarship details before applying.

The IGDA will award 10 university/college students admission to the 2005 Game
Developers Conference Europe, which is being held in London. Scholarship recipients will gain access to conference seminars, panel discussions and potential job opportunities.

http://www.igda.org/scholarships/