Spring 2017
“Transformative Games”


And now for something a little different – but still might be of interest to readers here..(Eds)


Transformative games are designed to initiate a change in the players’ beliefs or behaviors, a concentrated version of their predecessors in serious and educational games. Examples of “transformative games” include: Never Alone, Walden, Ballot Box Bumble, and The Oldest Game. Transformative games are digital and analog, single and multi-player, collaborative and competitive. In Media Res is looking for contributions that tackle issues specific to transformative games.

Among the topics that might be examined:
*Game Development Process
*Classroom Implementation Case Studies
*Explorations of a Specific Game
*Modding games for Transformative Use
*Reflection Activities for Specific Games


Proposals may be brief, but do be sure to describe the topic and key question(s) to be explored. Please submit your proposal by March 20th. If interested, please contact In Media Res ( with topic proposals or for more information about the theme. Be sure to include the name of the theme week you would like to be involved within the subject line of the email.

Academics, journalists, critics, media professionals and fans are all welcome to submit proposals.

The actual piece will include either a 30-second to 3-minute clip, an image, or a slideshow that will be accompanied by a 300 to 350-word response to/contextualization of your clip, image, or slideshow.

In addition to your piece, you will be expected to engage the other pieces presented that week to encourage discussion and further flesh out the individual topic in relation to the week’s theme.

About In Media Res:

In Media Res is dedicated to experimenting with collaborative, multi-modal forms of online scholarship. Our goal is to promote an online dialogue amongst scholars and the public about contemporary approaches to studying media. In Media Res provides a forum for more immediate critical engagement with media at a pace closer to how we experience mediated texts.

Each weekday, a different scholar curates a 30-second to 3-minute video clip/visual image slideshow accompanied by a 300-350-word impressionistic response. We use the title “curator” because, like a curator in a museum, you are repurposing a media object that already exists and providing context through your commentary, which frames the object in a particular way. The clip/comment combination are intended both to introduce the curator’s work to the larger community of scholars (as well as non-academics who frequent the site) and, hopefully, encourage feedback/discussion from that community.