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  • This topic has 23 replies, 14 voices, and was last updated 12 years ago by Anonymous.
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    • #6400
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Hi,

      Can anyone recommend a decent, free and very easy to use system that will let a few coders work on various parts of an engine?

      I’ve been trying to read up on the likes of sourceforge and Gnu Savannah (while in work :wink: ) but I thought I’d ask here to see if there’s a popular choice?

      I could be wrong but sourceforge seems to allow people to browse your directories (probably due to it being about open source!), I’d prefer some privacy.

      I use Source Safe a lot in work, so something similar to that would be great.

      Thanks

      Anthony

    • #39485
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      A simple solution would be to get some webspace, install Subversion and use Tortoise SVN from Windows to access it. Nice way of keeping small projects organised.

      I was under the impression that Sourceforge wasn’t as open as you’ve described though?

    • #39490
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      CVS is also free, I think…. although I much prefer SVN with the Tortoise client plug-in

      Sourceforge always seemed overkill to me and CVS just not that user-friendly

    • #39491
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Subversion is pretty much strictly better than CVS, so if you are looking for a CVS-alike, use subversion (svn).
      Probably better than sourcesafe.

      It seems you are looking for a complete solution rather than just a technology to use. In which case, you’ll want hosting for your source control. While there are many businesses that will provide hosted source control, you may be better off getting a generic hosted unix box (eg bytemark.co.uk), and installing your own source control.

      If budget is tight to the point where you can’t afford hosting, or if you are willing to adopt a different technology to CVS/SVN, I would strongly recommend considering git http://git.or.cz/
      It’s distributed, so you do not need a central server, and some developers I know have said very good things about it recently. I have never used it personally, whereas I have professional experience with CVS/SVN

    • #39493
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for the replies! :)

      I’ll check them all out over the weekend. I have a few Unix accounts and I may be able to use one as a host and set up SVN on it.

    • #39494
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      God call. :)

      If you need a hand setting it up feel free to drop me a PM.

    • #39495
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Blender recently switched from cvs to svn, and it’s a lot easier to use.

      TortoiseSVN is a great, and free, client.
      Mal

    • #39500
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We use Tortoise SVN here at work, and have never had a problem with it. We’ve got teams of programmers, 8-10 all working on the same code base without any issues.

      We also have a smaller team of two programmers and four artists, and they haven’t had any issues with Tortoise either. It doesn’t manage (allow mergeing / diffing) PSD’s or Max file very well (as opposed to something expensive / flash as AlienBrain) but it is free and easy to use.

      We also have started using Tortoise CVS just to access some online repositories and it is pretty straightforward.

      http://www.tortoisecvs.org/

      and

      http://tortoisesvn.tigris.org/

      We have also got a plugin for Visual Studio called AnkhSVN, which allows programmers to commit code direct from their Solution/Project within Visual Studio.

      http://ankhsvn.tigris.org/

      Don’t know if it works under VS2008 yet (watch this space), but it works great with 2005.

      Hope that helps.


      Brendan.

    • #39501
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      If you are looking for a free, private hosting of a project inclusive of subversion source control, then have a look at assembla.com, register and then when setting up a space ensure that all visibility options are set to ‘team’ and not ‘public’. It also comes with project milestones, trac and various other bits and pieces. You can then hook the tortoise-svn up from a pc as with any svn repo.

    • #39504
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Think I used Tortoise CVS before….was told not to make large check-ins because it couldn’t handle it, better to make several smaller ones.

      I’m a big fan of Perforce. You can get a free copy for a small team…2 users and as many workspaces as you like I think.

    • #39506
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Think I used Tortoise CVS before….was told not to make large check-ins because it couldn’t handle it, better to make several smaller ones. [/quote:00e61b6c73]
      Again, I recommend SVN above CVS.
      That said, never had that problem using Tortoise, when making big (both in terms of modifications or file size) checkins. Maybe it was an issue with your backend or something?
      Tortoise is not always the most user friendly though, can appear to be doing nothing for a long time at the start of a checkin when it’s actually working away.
      But a lot more user friendly than the command line versions of CVS would be for non-programmers.

    • #39514
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Dunno, it was with a company I previously worked for and they had a very large code base. I never liked it, I like Perforce :)

    • #39516
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We use Perforce here, it’s a great system alright.

    • #39517
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We use Perforce here, it’s a great system alright.[/quote:d7276809ca]

      same here. although perforce isnt with its little hiccups.!

    • #39518
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Heh yeah, if the server doesn’t have a load of RAM it can get kinda slow when people try to do big syncs alright.

    • #39519
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks again for all the replies! Much appreciated :D

      I got SVN set up on a unix account I have and I’m using Tortoise.

      Thanks to Gizmo for his help!

    • #39520
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      same here. although perforce isnt with its little hiccups.![/quote:59a39b2276]
      Yeah, is it too much to ask for a rollback button?

    • #39521
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Rollbacks?

      Thats what changelists are for.

    • #39522
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      same here. although perforce isnt with its little hiccups.![/quote:b016052b7b]
      Yeah, is it too much to ask for a rollback button?[/quote:b016052b7b]

      revision history?

      or am I missing something :?

    • #39523
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      same here. although perforce isnt with its little hiccups.![/quote:d088e225b4]
      Yeah, is it too much to ask for a rollback button?[/quote:d088e225b4]

      revision history?

      or am I missing something :?[/quote:d088e225b4]

      Revision history only allows the rolling back of each file individually. Changlist and labels allow a roll back to the full state AFAIK.

    • #39524
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, its easy to sync to a previous revision, getting perforce to accept the fact that you now want to check in the previous revision as the newest revision isn’t the simplest thing. It wants you to sync to latest version before you check it in and knobbles all your data…pain to do ( code is easy do this for, its harder when its data )

    • #39666
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Hi,

      Can anyone recommend a decent, free and very easy to use system that will let a few coders work on various parts of an engine? [/quote:5f29576724]

      Subversion is pretty good; I’m using it this year in college working on a team project and it certainly helps ease a lot of the versioning headaches encountered in a team based environment. Even if you are just working on a project alone it’s still pretty useful for keeping old versions of code that you can roll back to. Plus it comes with it’s own server built in, so it’s pretty easy to setup on the network. I can’t speak for CVS since I’ve never tried it, but from what I’ve heard of it, it doesn’t seem to be as good.

    • #39735
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      yet another vote for SVN and TortoiseSVN as a free solution that works

    • #40247
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      CVS has some well known issues that SVN attempts to fix [0].

      I’ve been using a decentralised VCS (Git) for a few months now and it has transformed my workflow. I think I’ll find it difficult to move back to a traditional VCS system such as SVN should I need to. This video [1] of Torvalds discussing the reasons he created Git is pretty entertaining.. CVS and SVN users beware.

      [0] http://subversion.tigris.org
      [1] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XpnKHJAok8

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